Department of Education Announces State Grant Program to Enhance Outcomes for Youth Receiving SSI

The Department of Education has published a notice inviting applications from states for a new competitive grant program, Promoting Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (PROMISE). PROMISE seeks to improve the education and career outcomes of low income children with disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The program is designed to serve children with disabilities, ages 14-16, who are receiving SSI and their families.

PROMISE is open to all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and states may apply together as a consortium. The Department intends to fund three to six projects at $4.5 million to $10 million a year for 5 years. PROMISE encourages formal partnerships with agencies and entities in the state that play a role in the development and implementation of policies and practices that affect child SSI recipients.

The Arc Opposes Benefit Cuts in the Washington Post

The Washington Post printed a letter by The Arc’s Marty Ford voicing our concern that using the “chained CPI” to calculate Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit Cost-of-Living Adjustments (COLAs) would be a less accurate measure of inflation and a harmful benefit cut.

Put a Face on Medicaid, SSI, Social Security

As Congress reconvenes for a post-election session where potential changes or cuts to programs like Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Social Security may be put on the table, we need your help to put a face on the importance of these programs by sharing lifeline stories about individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

The Arc’s national office needs stories from self-advocates, parents, and other family members, chapters of The Arc, other service providers, and friends. We have to put a face on programs like Medicaid, SSI, and Social Security in order to convince Congress to protect these programs from devastating cuts during budget negotiations. More than 200 stories have been submitted from 22 states. This is a great start, but it is critical that we receive sufficient stories from across the country.

Please share this survey with your members, the families you serve, and other organizations in your community so that we can gather as many stories as possible, and quickly, so that The Arc can help protect these lifeline programs.

New Report on Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for Children with Disabilities

The National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) has released a new brief, “Supplemental Security Income for Children with Disabilities.” The brief highlights the importance of SSI for children with significant disabilities and their families. Key findings include:

  • SSI plays a significant role in reducing poverty among children with disabilities, without reducing parental employment;
  • Nearly all of the increase in the number of children receiving SSI from 2000-2010 is explained by the increase in child poverty during that time; and
  • SSI payments to children as a share of U.S. Gross Domestic Product are projected to decline after 2013.

Put a Face on Medicaid, SSI, Social Security

As Congress reconvenes for a post-election session where potential changes or cuts to programs like Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Social Security may be put on the table, we need your help to put a face on the importance of these programs by sharing lifeline stories about individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

The Arc’s national office needs stories from self-advocates, parents, and other family members, chapters of The Arc, other service providers, and friends. We have to put a face on programs like Medicaid, SSI, and Social Security in order to convince Congress to protect these programs from devastating cuts during budget negotiations. More than 200 stories have been submitted from 22 states. This is a great start, but it is critical that we receive sufficient stories from across the country.

Please share this survey with your members, the families you serve, and other organizations in your community so that we can gather as many stories as possible, and quickly, so that The Arc can help protect these lifeline programs.

Put a Face on Medicaid, SSI, Social Security

As Congress reconvenes for a post-election session where potential changes or cuts to programs like Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Social Security may be put on the table, we need your help to put a face on the importance of these programs by sharing lifeline stories about individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

The Arc’s national office needs stories from self-advocates, parents, and other family members, chapters of The Arc, other service providers, and friends. We have to put a face on programs like Medicaid, SSI, and Social Security in order to convince Congress to protect these programs from devastating cuts during budget negotiations. More than 200 stories have been submitted from 22 states. This is a great start, but it is critical that we receive sufficient stories from across the country.

Please share this survey with your members, the families you serve, and other organizations in your community so that we can gather as many stories as possible, and quickly, so that The Arc can help protect these lifeline programs.

Put Your Face on Medicaid, SSI, Social Security

As Congress reconvenes for a post-election session where potential changes or cuts to programs like Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Social Security may be put on the table, we need your help to put a face on the importance of these programs by sharing lifeline stories about individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

The Arc’s national office needs stories from self-advocates, parents and other family members, chapters of The Arc, other service providers, and friends. We have to put a face on programs like Medicaid, SSI and Social Security in order to convince Congress to protect these programs from devastating cuts during budget negotiations.

Please share this survey with your members, the families you serve, and other organizations in your community so that we can gather as many stories as possible, and quickly, so that The Arc can help protect these lifeline programs.

SSI’s 40th Anniversary Highlights Importance for People with Disabilities

October 30th marked the 40th anniversary of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. SSI provides vital monthly income support to low-income children and adults with significant disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Benefits help people with disabilities live in the community and pay for necessities such as housing, clothing, and medicine. Learn more about the importance of SSI on The Arc’s blog and in a Huffington Post column by the Chair of the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities, and about threats to the program in a New York Times letter to the editor by The Arc’s Marty Ford.

Hearing on Use of Technology to Improve the Administration of SSI’s Financial Eligibility Requirements

On Friday July 20th the House Committee on Ways and Means, Human Resources Subcommittee will hold a hearing on the use of technology to improve the administration of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program’s financial eligibility requirements. Visit the Committee web site for more information and for live video the day of the hearing.

New GAO Report on SSI Children’s Program

The GAO has published a new report on the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program for children. The report affirms that the Social Security Administration (SSA) applies stringent criteria to evaluating applications, denying a majority of children who apply. GAO’s findings highlight several important facts about the program.

Notably, the GAO found that the share of children awarded SSI for mental impairments has remained stable for over a decade, at about 65% from 2000 to 2010. What changed were the diagnoses within the mental impairment category. For example, the proportion of children receiving SSI due to an intellectual disability fell significantly, from 51 percent of all mental impairment claims in 2000 to 15 percent in 2011. At the same time, the rates of more specific diagnoses, such as autism, rose dramatically.

Additionally, children taking medications for certain mental impairments are less likely to be approved for SSI. When no medication was reported, children with ADHD, speech and language delay, and autism were denied about 47 percent of the time and approved about 53 percent of the time at the initial application level. When medication was reported, 65 percent were denied and 35 percent were approved.

Finally, the GAO reported that the number of children applying for and receiving SSI has increased due to several factors, including the dramatic rise in child poverty over the last decade.