Health/Medicaid – Senate Declines to Vote on Repeal of the Affordable Care Act by Fiscal Year Deadline

Last week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) cancelled plans to hold a vote on the Graham-Cassidy bill. With Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 having ended on September 30, Congress can no longer use that fiscal year’s budget reconciliation process to pass the bill with a simple majority vote. It now requires 60 votes. This victory would not have been possible without the disability community. Had this bill become law, it would have:

  • Capped growth in per capita Medicaid spending at below the cost of providing services;
  • Replaced premium tax credits and Medicaid Expansion funds with a block grant that grows more slowly than current law and expires after 2026;
  • Redistributed funds away from states that accepted Medicaid expansion; and
  • Allowed states to let insurers sell plans that cover fewer services and charge more based on health status or disability.

The Senate Finance Committee hearing on the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson Proposal on September 25 was marked by high attendance of disability advocates. Protesters from ADAPT started a chant of “No cuts to Medicaid, save our liberty” and their arrests delayed the start of the hearing by 15 minutes. Senator Robert Casey (D-PA) mentioned The Arc’s advocacy and showed the stack of letters with stories from our advocates across the country.

While the cancellation of the vote on the “Graham-Cassidy” bill closed the door on Congress’s best opportunity to pass this legislation for now, there are still major challenges ahead. The 115th Congress can write two more budgets, one each for FY 2018 and FY 2019. With each budget, there is an opportunity for one reconciliation bill which requires only a simple majority to pass in the Senate. The reconciliation bill for FY 2018 will most likely focus on tax cuts. It is possible that Congress will attempt to cut Medicaid, Medicare, Supplemental Security Income, or other programs that pay for basic livings needs of people with disabilities as a way to offset revenue reductions. Additionally, Congress could attempt to pass an Affordable Care Act Repeal with Medicaid per capita caps and major tax legislation in one package. In summary, fewer pathways now exist to cut program that cover basic living expenses, but threats still remain. See article above for Congressional efforts to develop a new budget resolution similar to the most recent efforts which allowed for consideration of major Medicaid cuts and repeal of the Affordable Care Act in 2017.

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